SAPHEX Symposium

At SAPHEX, the cream of pharmaceutical manufacturers meet the suppliers of technology and service solutions for their manufacturing & pharmaceutical endeavours in the exhibition hall, they learn best practice at the conference, and they get the opportunity to network with their peers to set up important business relationships.

What's happening?

SAPHEX is established as the go-to event for pharmaceutical manufacturers in the burgeoning South African & SADC market-place. At SAPHEX, the cream of pharmaceutical manufacturers meet the suppliers of technology and service solutions for their manufacturing & pharmaceutical endeavours in the exhibition hall, they learn best practice at the conference, and they get the opportunity to network with their peers to set up important business relationships.

This conference is in partnership with the National Department of Health (NDoH), South African Association of Hospital and Institutional Pharmacists (SAAHIP), South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) and South African Pharmacy Council (SAPC)

Learn

Learn from industry-leading speakers discussing a variety of topics hot topics relevant to the industry.

Access

Access a wealth of knowledge during the seminars at the SAPHEX Conference.

Discover

Discover how you can improve your business and knowledge.

Day 1

TimeTopic
09:30-10:30National Department of Health (NDoH): Health Technology Assessment

The NDoH Essential Drugs Programme (EDP) coordinates the development of the national Essential Medicines List (EML) and Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) through the ministerially appointed National Essential Medicines List Committee (NEMLC) and Expert Review Committees (ERCs). The EML is an explicit list of medicines that should be available in the public health system. STGs provide guidance to healthcare professionals on the rational use of medicines. Over the past two decades, South Africa has incrementally increased the use of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) processes in selecting essential medicines in the public health sector. The selection of essential medicines and the development of STGs is based on an assessment of evidence for efficacy, safety, cost-effectiveness, and affordability, generally compared to the current standard of care.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Apply HTA processes to support decision-making for essential medicines in a resource-constrained fiscal environment, and
Learned new insights from applying HTA processes in the selection of medicines.

Session chair: Andy Gray, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Presentation:
The session chair will facilitate a panel discussion between:
Janine Jugathpal
Pharmaceutical Policy Specialist, Essential Drug Programme, National Department of Health
Maropeng Rapetsoa
Pharmaceutical Policy Specialist, Essential Drug Programme, National Department of Health
Jane Riddin
Senior Pharmaceutical Policy Specialist, Essential Drug Programme, National Department of Health
10:45-11:45National Department of Health (NDoH): National Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Surveillance Report

In May 2014, South Africa pledged its commitment to the World Health Assembly’s resolution “Combating antimicrobial resistance including antibiotic resistance’, and to develop the country’s national action plan on AMR. This was updated in 2018 to include animal health in the initially human-centric action plan. The AMR National Strategic Framework defines South Africa’s approach to managing AMR, with the vision of ensuring the appropriate use of antimicrobials by healthcare and animal health professionals in all health establishments in South Africa to conserve the efficacy of antimicrobials for the optimal management of infections in human and animal health. The Framework has 5 main pillars, one being to enhance surveillance, of which the AMR Surveillance Report is the result.

The panel session aims to outline the most important outcomes of the AMR Surveillance Report 2022.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Understand the current surveillance systems for AMR and antimicrobial consumption in the public and private sectors,
Have a comprehensive view of the AMR in blood cultures for the ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) pathogens in South Africa, and
Have a comprehensive view of antibiotic use in the private and public health sectors.

Session chair: Kim Faure, Global Antibiotic R&D Partnership

Presentations:
The session chair will facilitate a panel discussion between:
Chetna Govind
Outgoing Chairperson of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on AMR
Caroline Maluleka
Senior Pathologist, National Institute for Communicable Diseases
Michelle Gijzelaar
Outgoing member of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on AMR
Ruth Lancaster
Pharmaceutical policy specialist, National Department of Health
12:00-13:30South African Association of Hospital and Institutional Pharmacists (SAAHIP): Pharmacist’s role in managing the disease burden in South Africa

Human resources are critical to the delivery of healthcare services in all health systems, especially those that aspire to delivering effective universal health coverage. A comprehensive, safe and effective pharmaceutical service requires adequate numbers of appropriately trained and motivated pharmaceutical personnel, across a range of professional and support categories. South Africa has an absolute lack of human resources for health, exacerbated by uneven distribution between public and private sectors and between urban and rural settings. Pharmacy is no exception in that regard.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Review the currently available data on the number and distribution of pharmaceutical personnel in South Africa, highlighting the limitations of available data and sources,
Relate the available data to those from other countries and settings, using the FIP Pharmacy Workforce Intelligence: Global Trends Report (2018),
Explain how human resources for health affect the ability to deliver effective Universal Health Coverage (UHC), using the UHC Service Delivery Index, and
Explore the health systems challenges facing South Africa and the demands those place on pharmacy workforce, and the policy options that emerge.

Session chair: Nhlanhla Mafarafara, SAAHIP President

Presentation:
Human Resources for pharmacy – where we are and where to from here?
Andy Gray, University of KwaZulu-Natal
13:45-14:45South African Association of Hospital and Institutional Pharmacists (SAAHIP): Multidisciplinary collaborations

A multidisciplinary team involves a range of health professionals from one or more organisations working together to deliver comprehensive patient care. Multidisciplinary teams offer many benefits to patients and the health professionals working on the team. These include improved health outcomes and enhanced satisfaction for clients, and the more efficient use of resources and enhanced job satisfaction for team members. Achieving an effective multidisciplinary approach can be complex and might require significant changes to work practices, organisational arrangements, as well as multifaceted implementation strategies.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Discover how healthcare professionals from a range of disciplines can work together to deliver comprehensive care that addresses as many of the patient's needs as possible.
Discover how healthcare professionals can collaborate with Traditional Health Practitioners for better health outcomes

Session chair: Rofhiwa Mulibana, SAAHIP

Presentations:
The growing use of traditional/herbal medicines – what healthcare workers/pharmacists need to be cognizant/aware of
Mamolefe Selokela, Pharmacist/Traditional Practitioner, Mpumalanga African Traditional Medicines Manager
The pharmacist as the custodian of OTC Codeine
Rubina Shaikh, University of the Witwatersrand
15:00-16:00South African Association of Hospital and Institutional Pharmacists (SAAHIP): Wound care

Pharmacists are the most accessible healthcare professionals to the public and are presented with common emergencies such as burns, abrasions, etc.
They are better positioned to treat patients in the community and/or monitor outpatients with hospital referrals.
We also provide a brief introduction to Wound care by an esteemed nurse specialising in wound care. She will provide a quick wound care talk as a refresher for pharmacists.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Promote the involvement of pharmacists who order, store, and distribute/dispense medical devices, including wound care dressings,
Provide a basic refresher on wound care dressings for pharmacists at all levels,
Understand how to identify an infected wound,
Understand when to refer a patient for advanced wound care treatment and
Recognise the importance of collaboration between pharmacists and other wound care professionals for optimizing patient outcomes.

Session chair: Nhlanhla Mafarafara, SAAHIP President

Presentations:
Beyond Medications: Pharmacists as Wound Care Allies
Sybil Seoka, Managing Director, Ample Resources
Wound care 101
Angie Gordon-Davis, Independent wound care nurse

 

Day 2

TimeTopic
09:30-11:00National Department of Health (NDoH): Administration and management of pharmaceutical tenders

The National Department of Health's strategic focus is to ensure equitable access to quality healthcare through the availability of safe, effective and cost-effective medicines at the appropriate level of care. Therefore, there are mechanisms in place with which the department administers and manages the pharmaceutical tenders to allow easy procuring of all pharmaceutical and medical-related items deemed necessary for the public sector.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Impart the knowledge of administering transversal pharmaceutical contracts, thereby ensuring adequate and equitable supply of medicines, and
Understand how the NDoH manages the contracted pharmaceutical suppliers and ensures medicine availability through different alternative procurement mechanisms whenever the contracted suppliers experience supply challenges.

Session chair: Marione Schonfeldt, National Department of Health

Presentations:
Administration of pharmaceutical tenders
Ephodia Nyathi, Pharmaceutical Policy Specialist: Contracting, Governance and Policies Unit, National Department of Health
Supplier performance management, alternative procurement mechanisms and initiatives to improve medicine availability
Buhle Mbongo, Sourcing Specialist, National Department of Health
11:15-12:15National Department of Health (NDoH): Licensing of pharmacies and health professionals

The National Department of Health’s Licensing Sub-directorate is responsible, amongst other things, for the licensing of premises where medicines are kept and the health professionals who dispense or administer certain medicines and vaccines. The licences processed are provided for in different legislation, such as the Medicines and Related Substances Pharmacy Act, 1965 (Act No. 101 of 1965) and the Pharmacy Act, 1974 (Act No. 53 of 1974).

The session aims to provide information on the different licences and permits and licences processed by the Licensing Sub-directorate, as well as the criteria used to license the premises and persons.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Provide information on the criteria applicable to licensing of pharmacy premises,
Provide information on the licences issued by the Director-General that enable health professionals (other than pharmacists) to access medicines, and
Clarify provisions that enable nurse practitioners to dispense medicines.

Session chair: Mandi Bhembe, National Department of Health

Presentations:
Licensing of premises and professionals
Lehlogonolo Kekana, Pharmaceutical Policy Specialist: Licensing, National Department of Health
12:30-13:30South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA): Increasing awareness and reporting of medication errors

Medication error is any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is controlled by the healthcare professional, patient, or consumer. Such events may be related to professional practice, healthcare products, procedures, and systems, including prescribing, order communication, product labelling, dispensing, distribution, administration, education, monitoring, and use.

Medication errors can be classified in terms of several different approaches, which include the following:
An approach based on the stage in the sequence of the medication use process, such as prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, administration or monitoring.
An approach which considers the types of errors occurring, such as wrong medication administered, improper dose - overdose, under dose, extra dose, frequency, administration, wrong route or wrong patient.
Classification based on the harm caused to the patient or consumer: i.e., none; temporary, permanent or dead.

SAHPRA is mandated by law to oversee the safety, quality, efficacy and performance of all health products it regulates. It, therefore, ensures that all adverse events, including medication errors, are investigated, monitored, analysed and acted upon. SAHPRA’s Vigilance Unit, an active member of the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring (PIDM) since 1992, submits reports to the case report global database called VigiBase®. The WHO PIDM is a worldwide collaboration of 175 countries whose aims are the safer use of medicines for patients everywhere and building a global culture of patient safety.

Healthcare professionals are sometimes hesitant to report any adverse events, mostly medication errors, because of litigations. It should be noted that the basic philosophy of adverse events reporting, including medication error reporting is that it operates according to a no-fault principle. The objective is to identify systemic elements that can be addressed through a quality improvement cycle.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
prevent and mitigate medication errors, and
improv reporting of medication errors.

Session chair: Mafora Florah Matlala, South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

Presentations:
Awareness of medication errors
Busisiwe Mosane, South African Health Products Regulatory Authority
Reporting of medication errors
Victoria Sekiti, South African Health Products Regulatory Authority
13:45-14:45South African Pharmacy Council (SAPC): Improving compliance to Good Pharmacy Practice (GPP)

In Section 22(6) of the Pharmacy Act, the Council has the right to inspect pharmacy premises to assure the quality of pharmaceutical services provided therein in line with Good Pharmacy Practice (GPP) rules, amongst others. The frequency of a pharmacy’s inspection depends on the outcome of its previous grading, which indicates the level of compliance. It may be yearly (Grade C), every second year (Grade B), or in three-year intervals (Grade A).

Out of the 2023 inspections conducted, which included monitoring, training, disciplinary and new pharmacy inspections, 1 258 were Grade A, 56 were Grade B pharmacies, 601 were Grade C, and 108 were Grade D.

Council, through its disciplinary processes and committees, noted that some Responsible Pharmacists are not aware of the extent of their accountability to the Council in ensuring compliance with the provisions of legislation regarding pharmacy practice. The responsibilities of a Responsible Pharmacist are clearly outlined in the Rules relating to Good Pharmacy Practice (GPP); however, until recently, there was no outline of the criteria for registration thereof. For this reason, the Council has developed the Criteria to accredit a generic short course for a pharmacist who wishes to apply for registration as a Responsible Pharmacist as well as the criteria for their registration.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Understand the Legal Framework and Authority Underpinning Pharmacy Premises Inspections,
Gain insight into the compliance levels, allowing participants to identify trends and patterns that may influence the frequency and nature of future inspections, and
Clarify the responsibilities of a Responsible Pharmacist according to GPP Rules.

Session chair: Jan du Toit, South African Pharmacy Council

Presentations:
Improving compliance to Good Pharmacy Practice
Jan du Toit, Council Inspection Officer, South African Pharmacy Council
Pharmacy Inspections
Ziyanda Mfuku, Senior manager: Professional Affairs (Practice), South African Pharmacy Council
Training of a Responsible Pharmacist
Christine Venter, Councillor, South African Pharmacy Council
15:00-16:00South African Pharmacy Council (SAPC): Training of pharmacy support personnel

New enrolments on qualifications for the training of Pharmacist’s Assistants (i.e., National Certificate: Pharmacist Assistance (Basic) and Further Education and Training Certificate: Pharmacist Assistance (Post-Basic)) are coming to an end on 30 June 2024.

The SAPC and the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) developed new qualifications for pharmacy support personnel. There is a provider of education and training accredited by the South African Pharmacy Council to offer training on the new qualifications i,e., Occupational Certificate: Pharmacist’s Assistant (Basic) and the Occupational Certificate: Pharmacist’s Assistant (Post-Basic). The Office of the Registrar is evaluating applications from other applicants who would like to offer these qualifications.

After this session, attendees will be able to:
Understand the delivery of the Occupational Certificate: Pharmacist’s Assistant (Basic) and the Occupational Certificate: Pharmacist’s Assistant (Post-Basic),
Understand the transition from the previously registered qualifications to the new qualifications,
Understand the implications and challenges that the introduction of the Occupational Certificate qualifications may pose for stakeholders, and
Recognize potential collaboration opportunities between training institutions, the SAPC, and other stakeholders involved in the training of Pharmacist’s Assistants.
Session chair: Moliehi Matlala, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

Presentations:
Training of pharmacy support personnel
Moliehi Matlala, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
Implementation of the new qualifications and the role of quality councils
Hloni Masiza, Senior Manager: Professional Affairs (Education), South African Pharmacy Council
Making the case for pharmacy support personnel
Teri-Lynne Fogarty, Nelson Mandela University
Meet the speakers

"A well organised and informative event, the conference was professional and convenient."

"I got to meet so many new people and grow my network. I will definitely be returning next year."

"Absolutely outstanding! A MUST EVENT FOR EVERY ONE!"

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